The Pionners' trail is opened since almost two years now and, despite the fact that a lot of work has to be undertaken, a great number of resident are using it for hiking ans snowshoeing. Here is an extract of Cyrus Thomas from his book "History of the Counties of Argenteuil and Prescott, from the earliest settlement to the present" (1896)

The Pionners' Trail is situated on land previously owned by Pioneer Hazel Hicks, who in mid 1800s owned a horse that travelled many times to Lachute. We should someday install a sign or a plaque quoting this story.

"For a long time, the only horse in Gore was one which belonged to a pioneer whose name was Hazlitt (or Hazlet) Hicks, and it is doubtful if any horse has become as famous since the days of Bucephalus-the war horse of Alexander (the Great). His services were not so much required in clearing or tilling the land, for the men, by uniting their efforts, performed much of the labor that in later years was done by oxen or horses, but in conveying grists to and from the mill this particular horse was of priceless value, not only to his owner, but to all his neighbours. So many were the loads of corn he drew to the mill at Lachute that he began to be called “Cobby”, and the name is as well known to-day in Gore, and in adjacent localities, as that of John A. Macdonald.

The price of “Cobby” for a day was a day’s work, to be given to his owner by the one who hired him; and many a day’s work did he earn for his master during the thirty years “Cobby” is said to have lived.For a long time, the only horse in Gore was one which belonged to a pioneer whose name was Hazlitt (or Hazlet) Hicks, and it is doubtful if any horse has become as famous since the days of Bucephalus-the war horse of Alexander. His services were not so much required in clearing or tilling the land, for the men, by uniting their efforts, performed much of the labor that in later years was done by oxen or horses, but in conveying grists to and from the mill this particular horse was of priceless value, not only to his owner, but to all his neighbours. So many were the loads of corn he drew to the mill at Lachute that he began to be called “Cobby”, and the name is as well known to-day in Gore, and in adjacent localities, as that of John A. Macdonald.

The price of “Cobby” for a day was a day’s work, to be given to his owner by the one who hired him; and many a day’s work did he earn for his master during the thirty years “Cobby” is said to have lived."

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